hEADER

Le magazine Analele Ştiinţifice ale Universităţii „Al. I. Cuza” deIaşi

Archiver 2015

STEPHEN HOLLEY

A Treatise on the Understanding of Marriage: A Plea for the Necessity of Pre-Marital Counselling

 

ILIE MELNICIUC-PUICĂ

John’s Gospel Quotations, Allusions, and Parables in Farewell Discourse

 

GHEORGHE PETRARU

The Role of Emotion in the Personal Encountering of Truth in Religion and Science

 

VASILE CRISTESCU

Jesus Christ, Holder and Giver of the Holy Spirit in Saint Athanasius the Great

 

DAN SANDU

Principles and Practices of Diakonia in the Romanian Orthodox Church

 

CONSTANTIN IULIAN DAMIAN

Between Asuras and Māyā: The Hindu Aetiology of Suffering

 

LIVIU PETCU

The Confession of Sins as a Re-Establishment of Man’s Communion with God in the Teachings of Saint John Chrysostom

 

CARMEN-MARIA BOLOCAN

Saint Jean Chrysostome et la catéchèse

 

IONUT-GABRIEL NASTASA

Unpublished Musical Manuscripts from Agapia Monastery (20th century)

 

La première étude en 2015

Deacon
Pro Vita Association,
Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The Lord Jesus, answering a question from the Pharisees concerning divorce said concerning marriage: “Have ye not read, that He Who made them at the beginning made them male and female, And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they two shall be one flesh? Wherefore they are no more two, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder” (Mt. 19:4ff). Thus, marriage is as old as creation itself, as old as the separation of the sexes: male and female. There was no other man for Adam to “marry;” there was no other woman on whom Eve could bestow her God-given affections. In one dynamic sentence the Lord Jesus ruled out homosexual unions of any kind (as well as human/”other” relationships which will naturally follow the legalization of homosexual “marriage” in the warped intentions of the Evil One!), as well as, the freedom to dissolve the Sacramental Union of Holy Matrimony for frivolous reasons! Therefore, it behooves every one of us who is contemplating marriage before God to “think it through” thoroughly before entering into this Sacramental relationship. We need to be like the King who counted his armies before going to battle and the builder who counted the cost before building his tower (Lk. 14:28ff), lest we begin to build and not finish, and what had been started and left unfinished become a mockery to us and to our lives in Christ.

 

Keywords: trust, love, giving, mind, submission, persons, one flesh, eternal

 

Read more: Here

Rev.Assoc. Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
“Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
Of all the biblical quotations and allusions in the Fourth Gospel with Messianic emphasis in the Johannine community, many are grouped together in the first 12 chapters. Chapter 19 identified Jesus  with Servant of God with allusion to Pss.22 and 69. There are six specific instances in Jn. 13-17 that demonstrate how Jesus Christ fulfilled Messianic Prophecy from the O.T. The chiastic structure of the Old Testament quotations and allusions underline the fact that inspired Scripture is the best interpreter of inspired Scripture. The Farewell Discourse (Jn. 13-17) is composed of two explicit quotations, two allusions and two Old Testament parables, applied by Jesus concerning His mission to his Disciples in this world. The Judeo Christian hermeneutic allows us to know Christian life by the centrality of Scripture and how the first communities interpreted the it. Belief in Jesus was strengthened by comparison of Jesus’ words with the Old Testament.

 

Keywords: John’s Gospel, Jesus, comparison, Scripture, fulfill

 

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Rev.Prof.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The experience of otherness always involves some emotion, especially in encountering the Divine in Its disclosure, expressed in sacred texts as Revelation and theologically interpreted, or experienced in a mystical state, be it ritual celebration. It is thoroughly human for mankind to experience joy in social relationships. It is of great emotional and spiritual satisfaction to make scientific discoveries, especially those useful to humanity at large. Relationship with God  of the human person and nature brings joy and induces deep spiritual emotions in us which create a catalyst for knowledge and action. Emotion is linked with confidence in the act of changing the dynamic world in light of the transcendent vision grasped which offers itself in order to be observed and acted upon. A non-static ontology, allowing for relational dynamics and the compassion of people who are in communion together in their complex psychological and neurological perspectives, allows one the possibility of discovering new truth and values.

 

Keywords: cognition, discovery, emotion, experience, mystery, person, religion, relation, science, truth.

 

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Associate Prof.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
In the current exegesis it has been determined that Jesus, the Son of God, can be established as the subject of a causal sentence of John 3:34b and Christians who believe in Him as the recipients of the Spirit given by Him in wholeness. In the patristic literature, the one who strongly emphasized Christ in the act of giving the Spirit, meaning the one who showed Christ as Holder and Giver of the Holy Spirit while emphasizing the indissoluble link between Christ and the Holy Spirit, is St. Athanasius the Great. He also fought against the adoptionist belief of the anointing of Christ with the Holy Spirit as represented by the Aryans. Saint Athanasius’ deep understanding of the co-affiliation of the Word and the Holy Spirit’s action makes him treat jointly Christology and Pneumatology, and see them indissolubly linked.

 

Keywords: Christ, Holy Spirit, Holder, Giver, Word, the Son of God, anointment, sealing, sanctification, man.

 

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Rev.Lect.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The Primitive Christian life revolved around three key activities: diakonia (social service), marturia (the profession of faith) and leitourgia (public work). Accordingly, diakonia would become primarily missionary work, i.e., a salvation ministry with personal dedication, while carefully avoiding becoming social activism. Perhaps it was this concern for the mystical and celebratory dimension of the diaconate that caused the deacon to become, relatively early, the servant of the bishop and coordinator of leitourgia, the liaison between the altar (the hierarchy) and the faithful (the laos). While the essence of Christian ministry is to preach the Gospel of forgiveness, resurrection and eternal life, such preaching is valid, credible and effective only as long as it is not isolated from the Gospel of love. The Gospel of love recognises that Christians, as disciples of Christ, by their acts of compassion and sharing in the physical sufferings of others, wherever these may occur, must act to alleviate that suffering. In this study, both from an historical and phenomenological perspective, I will try to point out that the main force behind social diakonia is the will to follow Christ or being Christ centred. Christ advocates service to his disciples, practises humility with dignity and obeys the Father to his own death, being moved by love. This love must become the driving force of any form of diakonia, which is why Eastern theology has favoured the term philanthropy, as the present paper will show.

 

Keywords: Diakonia, Romanian Orthodox Church, Philanthropy, Spirituality, Parish Life

 

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Constantin Iulian DAMIAN
Lect.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA
Postdoctoral Fellow POSDRU/159/1.5/136893 Project,
Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Vasile Astărăstoae
Prof.PhD.
Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
Hinduism is a generic term for a variety of schools, sects and practices that share common sources, beliefs, and concepts, but also encompasses divergent doctrines and ways of life in a single religious, philosophical, and social system. Inside this multifaceted tradition different and contradictory religious aetiologies of human suffering can be identified. In the Vedas, suffering is caused by an external agent (i.e. a personal activity of gods or asuras, which men can appease by rituals, rites, sacrifices, amulets, etc.) or as a godly punishment for man’s desires and anger. In Upanishads, suffering is related to karma, dharma, and samsara, as a natural consequence of the transgressions from this life or from past ones; the individual is the cause of his own suffering, by his karma. Seen in the wider picture of Vedanta, suffering has no substance, being part of the illusory empirical world that deserves no attention; assumed or self‐provoked, empirical suffering suggests detachment from this world and turns attention to the reality of Brahman. We consider that these aetiologies of suffering influence Hindus’ attitudes towards bodily pain and medical action, which can range from accepting treatment and pain relief as gifts from the gods (obvious especially in traditional medicine’s mix of religion and magic) to ascetics’ total indifference to bodily suffering.

 

Keywords: Hinduism, suffering, karma, Upanishads

This paper was published under the frame of European Social Found, Human Resources Development Operationl Programme 2007-2013, project no. POSDRU/159/1.5/136893

 

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Postdoctoral Fellow SOP HRD/159/S/1.5/133675

Project Romania Academy. Iaşi Branch. Romania

 

Abstract:
Although St. John Chrysostom did not exhaustively describe the Sacrament of Confession and has not listed all its conditions either, what he did clearly elucidate were those elements that solidify the authority of the Priest to hear confessions and absolve sins. The great Archbishop of Constantinople emphasizes not only the responsibility of the Priest to give counsel, but also to prescribe an appropriate canon. In his vision, just as worldly leaders have the power to judge and decide in reference to his vassals, Priests judge, decide, forgive, and set canons, which means that they have power and responsibility for the souls of believers over whom they have jurisdiction. This decision of theirs is received by God, Who Himself forgives and consecrates, using Priests as His instruments. True repentance must be made in secret before the Bishop or Priest who administers the redeeming grace. It must be accompanied by good works such as humility, repentance, fasting, alms and prayer. It must be sincere, complete and ongoing, just as sin is repetitive.

 

Keywords: confession, sins, penance, St. John Chrysostom, communion, remission, priest.

 

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Associate Prof.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Résumé:
Notre étude essaie de préciser les caractéristiques de la catéchèse chez Saint Jean Chrysostome. Il donne une importance particulière à l’éducation chrétienne en insistant sur les moyens et les méthodes d’éducation (le jeûne, la prière, la catéchèse – la description, l’explication, etc.). Saint Jean Chrysostome reste un modèle, toujours valable, pour l’éducation chrétienne.

 

Keywords: Jean Chrysostome, catéchèse, éducation, formation religieuse

 

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Rev.Assist.PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The present study briefly describes seven novelty musical manuscripts stored in the library of Agapia Monastery (Neamţ County, Romania). These were gathered in the course of the 20th century, representing collections of psaltic chants used in church services. Analyzing these manuscripts, I have identified without question the nuns preference for chants composed by Romanian authors. I have also noticed the involvement and musical influence of professor and composer Gh. N. Carp in the Psaltic Singing School from Agapia in the years between the World Wars.

 

Keywords: Agapia Monastery, psaltic music, musical manuscripts, church singing, composers, Gh. N. Carp

 

Read more: Here

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