hEADER

 

Revista Analele Ştiinţifice ale

Universităţii „Al. I. Cuza” din Iaşi

Teologie Ortodoxă

Arhivă 2017

EMILIAN-IUSTINIAN ROMAN

Church Legislation in the Time of Patriarch Justinian Marina

 

DANIEL NIŢĂ-DANIELESCU

The Cultural Inheritance of Holy Metropolitans Varlaam and Dosoftei. Notes on Metropolitan Veniamin Costachi’s Preface to the 1834 edition of the Liturgical Book

 

CARMEN LIVIA TUDOR

From the Life and Activity of a Tireless Scholar Monk, Vartolomei Mӑzӑreanu

 

ION VICOVAN

The Higher Theological Education in the Romanian Orthodox Church after
1990 – pastoral necessity and missionary responsibility

 

ADRIAN DINU

Pastoral care of young people: prophylaxis, remedies, practices

 

IOAN-CRISTINEL TEŞU

Health – divine blessing; illness and suffering – academy of virtues

 

IOAN-CRISTINEL TEŞU

Where the Suffering Comes from and What are its Couses

 

ILIE MELNICIUC-PUICĂ

Old Testament texts in pictural representation of Prophets

 

NICOLETA MELNICIUC-PUICĂ and ELENA ARDELEAN

Non-destructive analysis of black inks in medieval monastery manuscripts of
Moldavia (Romania)

 

Studii

Nr. II din 2017

Rev. Lect. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
In the present study we briefly review the legislation of the Patriarch Justinian on the 40th anniversary of his passing away. The legislative body we focused on bears his name, that is The Laws of the Romanian Orthodox Church during His Beatitude Patriarch Justinian 1948-1953, including The Statute for the Organization and Functioning of the Romanian Orthodox Church, 10 Regulations, Decisions of the Holy Synod, Patriarchal Decisions and a Canonical Guide with an Alphabetical Index compiled by Fr. Professor Dr. Liviu Stan.

 

Keywords: Romanian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Justinian, ecclesiastical organization, Religious and Civil Legislation, canon law

 

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Rev. Lect. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
In 1834 the Printing House of the Metropolitan Bishopric of Iasi issued the second edition of the Liturgical Book in Romanian. The work was addressed to the clergy, and Metropolitan Veniamin Costachi, who has been referred to as “a hesychast man of prayer and a European founder” completed the editorial work for the volume. In the Preface he sets his effort to translate the liturgical texts within the tradition of Holy Metropolitans Varlaam and Dosoftei, who lived in the seventeenth century. Veniamin also advocates the careful selection of terms, bearing in mind the fact that Romanian is “the daughter of Latin”.

 

Keywords: Varlaam, Dosoftei, Veniamin, Liturgical Book, Romanian language, translation, printing house

 

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Assist. PhD
Faculty of Letters,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
One of the cultivated personalities from the XVIIIth century Moldavia was the Archimandrite of Putna, Vartolomei Mӑzӑreanu. Ever since his childhood, he entered in the Monastery of Putna and received education at the school which was operating next to the monastic settlement. As he was leading a clean life, inclined to prayer and study, the Metropolitan of that time, Iacov Putneanul, recommended Mazareanu, between 1757 and 1763, to take care of the Monastery  of Putna as its abbot. Metropolitan Iacov Putneanul established a superior spiritual school at Putna meant to meet the spiritual needs of the time, and the organization of this school was in Vartolomei Mazareanu’s responsibility, who, by some sources, followed the model of the Theological Academy from Kiev. During this period of time, Archimandrite V. Mazreanu took care of the school of that place, both of its construction and the good course of its activity. It is notorious that he also consolidated the library of the theological school from the monastery, which consisted mainly of valuable manuscripts of the old copyists. In this way, there were preserved, until today, holy books, beautifully adorned, tied and maintained with appreciation.

 

Keywords: archimandrite, monastery, scholar monk, religious work, abbot, moral teaching, spiritual school

 

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Rev. Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
Since the very beginning of the ecclesiastic organization on the territory of our country, as a result of the preaching of the two Holy Apostles Andrew and Phillip, the Church has had pious servants, who were highly knowledgeable in the new redemptive teachings. Within the first schools, The Book of Hours and The Psalter were learnt, and, in the lordly Academies, theology had an important place. Starting with the end of the XVIII century and especially in the first half of the following on, seminaries for the preparation of the clergy were founded in all dioceses, and, later on, the first theology faculties appeared as well (towards the end of the XIX century). All the schools for the preparation of the clergy appeared out of a pastoral necessity. However, with the passing of time, they were also meant to meet the needs of certain missionary realities. The year 1990 represents a milestone for the theological education in general and especially for the superior theological one. A significant number of faculties and theology departments have been founded and re-founded, their number reaching 15 at present, with one or more specializations. In the new context, with the rise of their number and especially that of the graduates, who, many times, cannot find a working place in the field for which they have prepared, it is imperative that we have a (re)evaluation of the teaching  institutions, of the pastoral needs of the dioceses and of the missionary contribution or the missionary role of the graduates. All these with the purpose of improving each of our faculties/ theology departments, the didactic and researching activity, but also in order to connect ourselves as efficiently as possible to the pastoral necessities and the Church’s missionary exigencies.

 

Keywords: Church, school, theology, pastorate, mission

 

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Associate Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
According to Christian teaching I try to study here the two practical aspects related to pastoral care of the young: the approach to sexuality and the dilemma of the priestphysician. The pastoral preoccupation of the priest concerning children must be continued and intensified during adolescence and youth. I am firmly convinced that the vocation of priesthood highly encompasses the sphere of psychology. The psychological qualities of the priest, the ability to understand and identify human psychology, provide the efficiency of treatment starting from a temporal healing to eternity. Through the priest, the Church provides pastoral services, welcoming Christians in the life of Christ.

 

Keywords: liturgical practices, confessor, teenagers, Christians

 

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Rev. Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The Holy Fathers of the Orthodox Spirituality unanimously consider that pain, suffering, illness and death (as well as their entire range of forms and manifestations) are the consequences of the primal or ancestral sin and of the man’s free will that God endowed him from creation. However man misused it. Therefore they are the effects of the initial unfortunate choice made by him.

Sufferings and infirmities, pains and human diseases, they all culminate in death and were totally unknown to the primordial man before the fall in the ancestral sin. At that time he was in a state of perfection or relative perfection, having the capacity to improve it up to deification. By rationally using the faculties he received at creation and by exercising the gift of personal liberty with watchfulness and discernment, man would have been acquired the full resemblance to God.

Referring to this connection between the ancestral sin and the diseases of the first men’s descendants, the Orthodox theology teaches that their source lays in the original sin. By inheriting the human nature from our proto-parents, we receive all the positive energies capable of helping man to complete himself and to establish himself in the work of virtues, on the one hand. It means restoring it in a state similar to the original one and leading to union with God. At the same time, we inherit the weaknesses, impotence and death that have entered it and united with its being.

The spiritual writings, as well as the general human experience show that in the Christian life joys and sorrows, trials and sufferings are intertwined. Thus, there is no man who, from the dawn of his life until his end, had only some of them: be it joy or trouble. Moreover, the good Christian noticed that joys which are not lived in a beautiful and pure way will turn into occasions of falling, humiliation and suffering sooner or later. Likewise, the trials that were spiritually confronted bring relief and comfort, holy joy and salvation to the soul in the end.

From a Christian perspective, the attitude towards suffering supposes to assume it in a saintly way and to do the “philosophy of disease” as part of the “philosophy of life”. That is to discover the benefits these “involuntary sufferings” can bring to our spiritual life.

The plain and clear teaching of the Eastern Fathers consists of not wishing, seeking or asking for such painful experiences, because we are never fully convinced of our ability to receive and assume them. The physical and spiritual pain-bearing threshold is so different from one person to another and depends not only on his constitution, but also on his moral creed and philosophy of life. However, the same Orthodox Spirituality recommends that when disease “visits” us, we should receive and bear it with nobility of soul and moral dignity.

 

Keywords: Spirituality, Philokalia, illness, sufferings, martyrdom, patience, prayer

 

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Rev. Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
The spiritual writings, as well as the general human experience show that in the Christian life joys and sorrows, trials and sufferings are intertwined. Thus, there is no man who, from the dawn of his life until his end, had only some of them: be it joy or trouble. Moreover, the good Christian noticed that joys which are not lived in a beautiful and pure way will turn into occasions of falling, humiliation and suffering sooner or later. Likewise, the trials that were spiritually confronted bring relief and comfort, holy joy and salvation to the soul in the end.

In Heaven until the fall the first men did not know suffering, illness and pain. The condition they were in was of relative perfection, which they could transform into full resemblance to their Heavenly Father through the good exercise of liberty. They lived the happiness of communion with God and in full harmony with all the creation which served them completely. Man was created in a state of relative perfection, enjoying health both physically, that is the health of a body which fully followed his soul in that state and was also ontologically bound to God, and spiritually. This state of perfect health sprang from his pure and unaltered relationship with God. If man had not yielded to the temptation of tasting the material goods of the created world, but he would have continued to progress in good things by feeding himself from the relationship with God, this state of general perfection and health would have been absolutized and made eternal. There would have been a complete harmony between body and soul in the sense of perfect co-operation, in order to perfect the relationship with God to whom it would have been likened by the work of virtues. The same state of perfect harmony would have been imposed in his relationship with the whole world and it would have ruled between man’s body and soul forever, till his full spiritualization as the soul would have overwhelmed the body. Thus man would have manifested his original, priestly vocation as priest of all created things that were “very good” (Genesis 1: 31), and at the same time he would heve  been deserved the dignity he received as their “master” and “king”. By progressing in this relationship with the world and with oneself, man has also been progressed in his relationship with his Father, by increasing his knowledge about God and his union with Him.

Unfortunately, the original sin meant an existential failure which not only produced effects on his relationship with God and the world, but also manifested its effects on man himself - in his two genres: man and woman, who will experience the labour in the sweat of their face, the sorrow of bringing forth children and the suffering and death. 

The Holy Fathers of the Orthodox Spirituality unanimously consider that pain, suffering, illness and death (as well as their entire range of forms and manifestations) are the consequences of the primal or ancestral sin and of the man’s free will that God endowed him from creation. However man misused it. Therefore they are the effects of the initial unfortunate choice made by him.

The general point was that if each of us arrives at a time when we can no longer avoid it, the most important thing is to receive it as a “cross of our personal life”, as a clue of “our inner establishment” and our moral level of living. At the same time, we must see it as a sign of God’s “visitation” and even blessed and happy “election” for our spiritual ascension and salvation.

From a Christian perspective, the attitude towards suffering supposes to assume it in a saintly way and to do the “philosophy of disease” as part of the “philosophy of life”. That is to discover the benefits these “involuntary sufferings” can bring to our spiritual life.

Beyond seeking or wanting them, the Christian faith shows us what the true Christian behaviour should be in the limit situations of our lives, in times of sorrow and suffering. In this way, it teaches us how to transform painful and sad trials into ways and means of spiritual growth by adding them to the happy circumstances of our existence and by giving life itself a profound meaning and a high moral sense.

 

Keywords: orthodox spirituality, sufferings, illness, sin, divine pedagogy, salvation

 

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Associate Prof. PhD.
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:

The presence of the Old Testament prophets in iconography becomes possible through the ecclesial recognition of their holy activity and writings attributed to them. In three areas of the cult, they are painted: on the arch of the altar surrounding the image of the Virgin, on the top of the iconostasis and in the church tower under the scene of the angelic servants. After the nineteenth century messages appeared on the prophets' phylactery, that they felt the need to unify the message and paint their faces.

The freedom of painters, assumed as a continuation of the Byzantine iconographic tradition, varies between elaborate scenes of the prophets or in scenes full of hieratic symbols. The same freedom is found in the preference for some prophets, from the long line mentioned in the Old Testament. Each of 18 prophets nominated in this study present a concis message, summarizing the monotheism in connection with eschatological interpretation of Christians. We note the Church's preocupation to harmonize the hymnography with Christian iconography for the faithful who pre taste the future glory here on earth.

 

Keywords: Old Testament, Prophets, picture, Church, Byzantine Hermeneia

 

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Prof. PhD and Lecturer PhD
Faculty of Orthodox Theology,
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iaşi, ROMANIA

 

Abstract:
In Moldova (Romania), many monastic collections of valuable medieval manuscripts are being preserved, as a result of the long term efforts of the local monks. Today, monasteries such as Sucevita, Dragomirna, Putna, Neamt, Secu and others have medieval manuscripts of inestimable value. The article entitled „Non-destructive analysis of black inks in medieval monastery manuscripts of Moldova (Romania)” aims to identify the black inks of some medieval manuscripts of Moldavian region, in order to initiate a database of inks used in this area. The scientific analysis of manuscripts, using nondestructive methods, is a constant concern of the cultural heritage conservators and restorers, offering information about constitutive materials of manuscripts and their preservation state.

 

Keywords: non-destructive analysis, manuscript, black ink, carbon ink, metal gall ink

 

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Recenzii

Arhim. Benedict Sauciuc, Obiecte liturgice şi odoare bisericeşti la Mănăstirea Neamț, Editura Sf. Mina, Iaşi, 2017, pp. 471.


Rev. Lect. Phd. Emilian-Iustinian Roman


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